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Disagree
On the one hand I get your point, but I don't think this is practical. If the union backed employees get a raise solely because they are in the union, what message does that send? Your pay should be related to your efforts and ultimately your effectiveness to the team. It should not be tied to your involvement with a lobby.
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Agree
I agree that schools should be evaluated more comprehensively than just standardized tests (but I do see standardized tests as one of the most important measures - especially with the advances in testing recently with common core). 

Here are other powerful metrics I’ve seen in evaluating schools (in addition to standardized tests): student, parent and teacher evaluations, suspension rates, attendance rates, graduation rates, growth rates from beginning to end of year and demographic data to account for socio-economic factors (% English language learners, % on Free or reduced government lunches). 

Standardized tests aren’t perfect and they shouldn’t be expected to be... but they are a critical component.
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Yes
When a country (USA) is losing many billions of dollars on trade with virtually every country it does business with, trade wars are good, and easy to win. Example, when we are down $100 billion with a certain country and they get cute, don’t trade anymore-we win big. It’s easy!
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Agree
I think this makes sense. I do worry about class action lawsuit trolls that might extract value for their own good more so than protecting consumers... but on the whole I think it is fair to allow consumers to organize and protect their rights.
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Yes
No major country on earth can successfully retaliate against America in a trade war, for the simple reason that America has trade deficits with them all. America has proven more than once that its large and rich internal market can support itself, and if consumer prices rise, there is a point up to which a marginally more expensive flat-screen TV is worth the higher price in exchange for more Americans making those TVs in the first place. The calculation isn’t simply an economic one, but a strategic one too. Steel is a place to start because it shows in clear terms how the entire global economic scam works. China subsidises its industry and produces so much steel that the world price falls. This is uneconomical, but strategically smart. Allies of the US lower prices accordingly — sometimes they have their own elaborate forms of indirect protection, and sometimes they simply re-import Chinese steel — and the US steel industry, once the world’s leader, shrinks.
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